Archive for July, 2012

Continuous Production Control

Whilst working on a number of projects at AEM Cores, I produced a continuous production control dashboard application for their core production department.

This software help schedule core production in the factory and dramatically supported production planning and labour scheduling – achieving significant production cost savings.

It had two consoles in operation – two computers:

One that presented the production manager with the ability to create custom reports,

 

 

 

 

and another ‘kiosk’ console which showed the output of each type of core for each day in 30 days into the future. This meant that when the phone rang to book core production, the production manager could very quickly see ‘slow days’ and schedule the cores to be made then. It combated over time problems – from cost and staff availability points of view.

 

 

Here’s a few more screenshots:

textsummaryreport

Picture 1 of 7

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Posted by Tim - July 30, 2012 at 6:13 am

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Transformer Core Design Application

Unicore Control Software

I wrote this for a local manufacturer, AEM Cores. They had invented this brilliant new technology for making power transformer cores called Unicore.

A unicore assembled and split in halves

A unicore assembled and split in halves

For their first model machine I created a simple application that allowed editing and uploading of core configuration files. This was well received by their customer base as previously they had been using a DOS application and to put it nicely it challenged the machine owners.

Since making bad cores is an expensive thing to do, management decided that the new Model machine the UCM3000 and later the UCM4000 would have a full core design application with the ability to supervise the machine’s core production and to guide the operator through the process. If you look at the left most core – you will see that it is actually a left, a right, and an outer core.

 

UCM3000 Unicore machine

UCM3000

The application comprised:

  • Core designer capable of several core types and a myriad of core options
  • Core production supervisor
  • Machine maintenance schedule
  • Automatic uploading/updating of embedded control software
  • Integrated help – help is available in print as well

 

 

Here are some screen shots:

UCM3000 Brochure back

Picture 1 of 8

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Posted by Tim - July 30, 2012 at 5:41 am

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photos of my mini traveller

This story has a happy ending!

Here she is in March 2015 fully restored by it’s current owner.

After restoration by a second owner March 2015

After restoration by a second owner March 2015

After restoration by a second owner March 2015

After restoration by a second owner March 2015

1961 Mk1 Mini Traveller – SOLD

  • It’s without the original motor/gearbox, but I have the original plates and rego papers in my name so ownership transfer is a possibility.
  • I also have the plate with the engine number on it – engine numbers in 1960 travellers were riveted to the block.
  • The wood is all there, but the wagon needs a lot of body work to be fully restored.
  • Mini car number M-AW4 – 88810
  • Body number FE 127168
  • Serial numberĀ  on the slam panel 005794
  • Engine number 8AM-U-H103681

It’sĀ  worth more than you’d think. Its an early Mk1 internal tank. The register in the UK only has 17 internal tanked Morris’s on their list. There are only three internal tanked woodies that I know of in Australia and yours is the earliest one of them. Do you have a heritage certificate for it? From the engine number I’d guess its from late 1960 or very early ’61.

Snap, maybe we’re twins? Our Minis are identical

I’d be really interested to see what Heritage reckon about the dates. Interesting that your engine number is 1000 odd earlier than mine, but the chassis number and FE number is about 1000 later.

The only other internal tank woody that I know of in Australia is an Austin, belonging to Garry in Albury. His is a fortnight earlier than mine, but has a higher engine number. They didn’t necessarily install the engines in the order that they were made, but I’m surprised that they were that far apart.

Timbo owner of another traveller. Featured on Timbo’s blog

It was my grandfathers car and I remember travelling in it with him as a nipper. I rang my mother and best we could work out was that my grandfather purchased the car in his retirement at age 60 and then only used it to go shopping and visit us and my uncle. It was his first and only car – he travelled by bus right up to that point. We think this was about 1970. It never carried more than pensioner’s shopping and 2 pensioners. My grandfather was a fitter and turner/ mech engineer who designed precision lawn mowers for Scott Bonner. Precision lawn mowers? – for bowling greens. His mowers were designed to cut every blade of grass to the exact same height – and they did. He died in 1982 and my last registration was in 1984. When I got it – it was a clean road worthy car. I feel bad now knowing what it is. Did he know what he left me? Argh – Sigh.

Grill – I don’t think this is the original grill. Ok I guess I know it’s not. I think it was exchanged a couple of years into my Grandfather’s ownership as he was having big problems with car reliability in the wet and he was transporting my sick Grandmother and breaking down. For what it’s worth the car died in my possession from over heating and now I wonder if this grill modification might have been responsible. The day it died it was very hot and my Grandparents would never have left the home in that kind of heat. Oh I fitted a new dizzy cap and leads and she was fine in the water.
The traveller is rusted – apparently the old steel bodies are famous for it. I think most of it is surface rust – I have yet to find any place beyond repair – the worst rust for some reason is in the passenger door.

It’s without the original motor/gearbox, but I have the original plates and rego papers in my name so ownership transfer is a possibility. I also have the plate with the engine number on it – engine numbers in 1960 travellers were riveted to the block. The wood is all there, but the wagon needs a lot of body work to be fully restored.

It was my grandfathers car (he bought it when it was about 8 years old) and then I inherited from him. I remember travelling in it with him as a nipper. So 3 owners only.

Been gunna restore it for 25 years and never had the time. Still don’t have the time and now moving to smaller house – don’t have the space.

 

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Posted by Tim - July 11, 2012 at 3:30 am

Categories: Mini   Tags: